26941 OCdt (III) David Chadwick – Walks the Talk

26941 OCdt (III) David Chadwick 2 Squadron – Infantry – Degree Program: History

What were your inspiration & motivation to attend military college?

What is your most favourable memory of your time at RMCSJ /RMCC?

What is your most disappointing memory of your time at RMCC?

What changes would you like to see at RMCC which would make it a better overall experience for those who will be following you?

What books influenced you most as a student and how?

Which senior cadet(s) and / or staff influenced you most as a I, II, III Year and how?

What– in your opinion– makes a good leader?

What does TDV mean to you?

What is your ultimate goal after leaving RMCC?

What inspires you to be the person you are today?

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Questions for leaders of tomorrow:

What were your inspiration & motivation to attend military college?

My first inspiration to attend RMC was a Major in the Artillery who worked with my Cadet Corps. Major Michael Calnan attended RMC and often suggested it would be a good career path for those considering a career as an officer in the Armed Forces. I became motived to join RMC based on the fact that I would be able to train in the military whilst concurrently attaining a degree – for me this was the perfect match.

What is your most favourable memory of your time at RMCSJ / RMCC?

My favorite memory from my first year at RMC Saint Jean occurred towards the end of the second semester when the Military Skills team conducted a confirmation exercise in the Farnham training area. On this occasion, a Griffon helicopter flew a portion of my section into the training area where we continued to conduct a reconnaissance exercise. Moving onto RMC in Kingston, my favorite moment occurred when I was nominated as the most valuable team member of the 2015 Sandhurst Team in my first year on the team. Receiving this recognition was a great honor for me and is something I will never forget.

What is your most disappointing memory of your time at RMCC?

My most disappointing memories at RMC have occurred when good friends have decided to leave for their own personal reasons. Most significantly, the bonds made during the orientation period or FYOP seem inseparable, but once a member of that group leaves you are very sad to see them go. Of course, today I still keep in touch with some of my departed friends.

What changes would you like to see at RMCC which would make it a better overall experience for those who will be following you?

I would like to see a greater emphasis put on military training. I truly believe that every member of the Canadian Armed Forces should consider themselves a soldier first, and thus, routinely practicing basic soldier skills should be a priority in terms of professional military training. Furthermore, a greater emphasis on physical fitness. Physical fitness is not only an operational necessity, but it greatly affects one’s ability to lead. I’ve heard said that an officer should strive to be the fittest person in the room, and this is something that I believe all Officer Cadets should strive to achieve.

What books influenced you most as a student and how?

As a student, I focused the majority of my reading on Canadian combat operations in Afghanistan. I believe my generation of leaders is at a disadvantage having not experienced the last greatest military involvement in a combat theatre since Korea. As an aspiring infantry officer, I will be obligated to lead men and women who have experienced this theatre of operations and thus I believe it is imperative to gain as much of an understanding of what happened there as possible.

Which senior cadet(s) and / or staff influenced you most as a I, II,Year and how?  

In my first year, I will always remember my Squadron Commander and Sergeant. Captain Dave Simpkin was a terrific leader and one of the fittest men in the Canadian Armed Forces. Captain Simpkin demonstrated perfectly the values of a good officer in terms of professionalism, compassion, and inspiring fitness. His right hand man, Sergeant Étienne Cameron, demonstrated the perfect example of a tactical leader and non-commissioned member. Furthermore, Sergeant Cameron was my first instructor of military skills that motivated me to train on the Milskills teams in both Saint Jean and Kingston. I am certain that I would not be where I am today if it were not for the level of leadership I was exposed to as a first year Officer Cadet.

Moving to Kingston in my second year, I became heavily involved with Military Skills teams and Sandhurst. I will never forget the guidance and leadership of Officer Cadet Justin Hanlon who was the team IC of the A Division MilSkills team. Justin demonstrated nothing but perfect professionalism when instructing the team and was my greatest motivation to attend Sandhurst selections. Throughout my two years thus far with the Sandhurst team, I have been inspired by many ex-cadets from the team, support staff, and members from Joint Task Force 2. A very inspirational figure throughout this time has been Warrant Officer Julian Wieczorek. WO Wieczorek has provided me an abundance of professional development towards being a future platoon commander. Having the ability to work with an experienced platoon Warrant Officer is something every aspiring infantry officer should strive for.

What– in your opinion– makes a good leader?

Simply put, a good leader is an individual that is willing to continually put the needs of his people ahead of their own. Furthermore, a good leader must take every opportunity to develop and test the abilities of his or her subordinates and utilize their skills to the greatest of their abilities. Finally, a good leader leads by example and should always be found in front of his or her troops.

What does TDV mean to you?

Truth, Duty, Valor, is a moral code that all aspiring leaders should strive to achieve. Firstly “Truth” is the obligation to pass on sound and timely information in order to successfully complete the mission. “Duty” is accepting the responsibility and burden of command and understanding that it may not always be easy or glamorous. Within duty, the leader must accept that they must always remain loyal to their subordinates no matter what the situation. Finally, “Valor” is the fundamental characteristic that defines leadership. A leader must have courage and determination at all times and must never fail to remain offensively eager to complete the mission and maintain the welfare of his or her subordinates.

What is your ultimate goal after leaving RMCC?

My ultimate goal after leaving RMCC is to lead soldiers in a combat theatre. Ultimately, it is my desire to work with soldiers in an environment that utilizes the skills developed in the profession of arms.

What inspires you to be the person you are today?

I am inspired by the unique opportunity I have been afforded. Not many Canadian citizens have been given the opportunity to work with some of the finest soldiers in the world and to experience things that could never be encountered in a civilian lifestyle. Furthermore, I am truly inspired by individuals who have served Canada in the past and present and, to have had the honor to have worked with them inspires me to follow in their footsteps.

A message to all:

The greatest lesson I have learnt from RMC is that nothing will come to you unless you work for it. This institution will always offer opportunities to those who work for them, and the rewards are endless. If at any point, you believe the institution is not working for you, you have not realized that it is you that should be working for the institution.

I challenge everyone to seek responsibility and challenges, and for those that are willing to take that risk, you will find that it is worthwhile.

Finally, I believe that all must be proud to serve in the Canadian Armed Forces. Recently on a trip to the Heroic Military College in Mexico and a Mexican Special Forces Base, I realized first hand that trials and tribulations of being in the profession of arms are universal. Soldiers all over the world are ultimately the same, but it is their actions that define them. During this trip, I felt immensely proud to be in the Canadian Armed Forces as a result of the inherently Canadian values that our military holds strong. Nations across the world are drawn to Canadian soldiers because of this and it is something that we must never take for granted. During this trip, the highlight for me occurred when we were given the opportunity to instruct the Cadets from the Guatemalan team how to overcome the 14 foot wall. Coaching this team to success, and witnessing their courage to attempt something new with offensive eagerness developed a mutual respect and sense of fulfillment that I will never forget.

 

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