• Home
  • /
  • m. Extra Innings
  • /
  • Canadian reservists attend NATO course / Des réservistes canadiens participent à un cours de l’OTAN

Canadian reservists attend NATO course / Des réservistes canadiens participent à un cours de l’OTAN

Canadian reservists attend NATO course/

With 18,000 NATO members currently engaged in military operations around the world, one is reminded of the importance of an integrated Alliance, founded on common and professional training and education standards.

Since 1949, NATO Forces – both Regular and Reserve Force – have participated in missions around the world. Reservists have served proudly alongside Regular Force personnel; they often possess niche capabilities, that they gain through civilian employment and education, making courses like the NATO School’s Reserve Forces Integration Course (RFIC) all the more relevant.

Located in Oberammergau, Germany, an area rich in military history and unique Bavarian architecture, the NATO School is the premiere individual training and education academy for operational-level learning. The school’s goals are captured in its motto: “Knowledge Enables Capability”.

Quelque 18 000 membres de l’OTAN sont actuellement engagés dans des opérations militaires partout dans le monde, ce qui fait ressortir l’importance d’une alliance intégrée, fondée sur des normes d’instruction et d’apprentissage communes et professionnelles.

Depuis 1949, les forces de l’OTAN, soit la force régulière et la force de réserve, ont participé à des missions dans le monde entier. Les réservistes ont fièrement servi aux côtés de membres de la force régulière. Souvent, ils possèdent des capacités spécialisées, acquises dans le cadre d’emplois civils et d’études; les cours comme celui sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve de l’école de l’OTAN deviennent donc de plus en plus pertinents.

Située à Oberammergau, en Allemagne, région dont l’histoire militaire est riche et qui présente une architecture bavaroise extraordinaire, l’école de l’OTAN est l’académie d’instruction individuelle et d’éducation par excellence pour l’apprentissage au niveau opérationnel. Les objectifs de l’école sont rendus dans sa devise : « Knowledge Enables Capability » (les connaissances favorisent la capacité).

more / plus

Canadian reservists attend NATO course/

By 21463 Major Petra Smith

With 18,000 NATO members currently engaged in military operations around the world, one is reminded of the importance of an integrated Alliance, founded on common and professional training and education standards.

Since 1949, NATO Forces – both Regular and Reserve Force – have participated in missions around the world. Reservists have served proudly alongside Regular Force personnel; they often possess niche capabilities, that they gain through civilian employment and education, making courses like the NATO School’s Reserve Forces Integration Course (RFIC) all the more relevant.

Located in Oberammergau, Germany, an area rich in military history and unique Bavarian architecture, the NATO School is the premiere individual training and education academy for operational-level learning. The school’s goals are captured in its motto: “Knowledge Enables Capability”.

Eight Canadian Armed Forces reservists recently participated in the RFIC, a five-day, residential course that included interactive lectures, reflective discussions, question and answer sessions, and syndicate work with fellow NATO and Partnership for Peace members.

“I gained a much better appreciation of the scope and breadth of NATO writ large,” said Major Brian Morrissette, a pilot with the Royal Canadian Air Force’s 402 Squadron, located in Winnipeg. “Getting the immediate perspective of the other students in the class with respect to NATO and comparing and sharing reserve best practices was a very practical learning experience.”

During the course, students learned about NATO command and operations structures, current operations, the NATO strategic concept, the role of reserve forces within NATO as well as the force generation and force employment models of national reserve forces.

“The main advantage of the Reserve Forces Integration Course is that it reflects the operational and political reality, which starts with intercultural awareness offered at the NATO School,” said Lieutenant-Colonel Stefan Ristow from Germany, who was the course director. “This course gives students the opportunity to build networks: we cannot solve things on our own.”

To enable multicultural interactions, the students worked in small groups called syndicates to analyze potential new roles for reservists, leveraging reserve capabilities, Regular Force-Reserve Force interoperability and reserve recruitment.

“It was an opportunity for me to learn about aspects of NATO that I wasn’t aware of – and I have deployed on NATO operations and exercises,” said Captain Jon Baker from 38 Canadian Brigade Group headquarters in Winnipeg. “More importantly, I valued the opportunity to discuss common challenges with other NATO and ‘Partnership for Peace’ reserve officers. There will be ideas and training materials from this experience that I will take back with me and incorporate into training and planning at my Reserve unit.”

As noted on the NATO website, “[NATO] forces are currently operating in Afghanistan, Kosovo, the Mediterranean and off the Horn of Africa. The Alliance is also supporting the African Union, conducting air patrols over the Baltic States, and air defence support activities in Turkey on the request of its Allies.”

“You have gained an understanding of each other’s diversities and established friendships,” said Colonel Jaromir Alan of the Czech Republic, chair of the NATO National Reserve Forces Committee (NRFC), following the syndicate presentations. “Diversity is good and evolutionary.”

Chairmanship of the NRFC changes every two years. The Czech Republic took over from Bulgaria in July 2016, and will pass the chairmanship to Poland in 2018. The committee provides policy advice to NATO’s Military Committee on reserve issues, strengthens the Reserve Force through discussion of best practices and lessons learned, and liaises with stakeholder organizations.

“The Reserve Forces Integration Course provided the unique opportunity to maintain the free exchange of information,” said Colonel Maria Gedayova of the Czech Republic, the secretary general for the NRFC and course action officer. “You produced concrete outcomes, and the course allowed us to gather, to see how we work, and to share culture.”

“The Reserve Forces Integration Course is similar in form to the National Reserve Forces Committee,” said Colonel Alan. “Your findings will be discussed during the next session.”

In addition to the residential course, students participated in Joint Advanced Distance Learning related to NATO reserve policies and Integrating Gender Perspective in Operations.

As graduates of the NATO School, the students will now have access to more than 140 high-quality advanced distance learning programs that include topics such as  peacekeeping techniques, operations in the information age, introduction to Hague and Geneva law, and mine awareness.

An increasing number of reservists are contributing to NATO operations, making RFIC all the more relevant since it enables analysis of the unique national paradigms, shares best practices, and focusses on integration with the Regular Forces for operational excellence.

“The course broadened my awareness of the complexity of the security issues facing NATO, and this will serve me well as I undertake Joint Command and Staff Program and any future operations with our partners in the Alliance,” said Lieutenant-Commander Joseph Banke, executive officer at Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship (HMCS) Carleton in Ottawa.

“The cross-cultural aspect of the course was very important as it is interesting to hear that other partner nations are facing some of the same challenges that we are in the [Canadian Armed Forces], such as recruitment and employer support, and those partners have some best practices that we can learn from.”

Other Canadian Armed Forces students were Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew Morrison, commanding officer of 36 Signals Regiment, headquartered in Halifax, Nova Scotia; Lieutenant-Commander Sheyla Dussault, executive officer with HMCS Carleton; and Major Stephane Gosselin from the Directorate Reserves and Major John Nowak from the Directorate of Air Reserves, both in Ottawa.

For more information, visit the NATO School website at www.natoschool.nato.int.

Editor’s Note: Major Smith is the staff officer for professional development and reserve training management at 2 Canadian Air Division. “I was fortunate to participate in the Reserve Forces Integration Course at the NATO School,” she said.  “An understanding of the different national approaches provides for a more seamless integration in time of operations and allows for sharing of best practices.  I valued the opportunity to learn from our allies on this professionally-invigorating course that contextualizes what we do on a daily basis.”

Students attending the Reserve Forces Integration Course gather for a photo at the George C. Marshall European Centre for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, on July 20, 2016. There they learned about the unique academic programs the centre offers. PHOTO: Submitted

For more detailed information regarding exciting, meaningful, and rewarding Reserve employment opportunities across Canada, please visit the Reserve Employment opportunities website.

***

Des réservistes canadiens participent à un cours de l’OTAN

Par 21463  le major Petra Smith

Quelque 18 000 membres de l’OTAN sont actuellement engagés dans des opérations militaires partout dans le monde, ce qui fait ressortir l’importance d’une alliance intégrée, fondée sur des normes d’instruction et d’apprentissage communes et professionnelles.

Depuis 1949, les forces de l’OTAN, soit la force régulière et la force de réserve, ont participé à des missions dans le monde entier. Les réservistes ont fièrement servi aux côtés de membres de la force régulière. Souvent, ils possèdent des capacités spécialisées, acquises dans le cadre d’emplois civils et d’études; les cours comme celui sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve de l’école de l’OTAN deviennent donc de plus en plus pertinents.

Située à Oberammergau, en Allemagne, région dont l’histoire militaire est riche et qui présente une architecture bavaroise extraordinaire, l’école de l’OTAN est l’académie d’instruction individuelle et d’éducation par excellence pour l’apprentissage au niveau opérationnel. Les objectifs de l’école sont rendus dans sa devise : « Knowledge Enables Capability » (les connaissances favorisent la capacité).

Huit réservistes canadiens ont récemment participé au cours sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve de l’école, un cours en résidence de cinq jours qui comprenait des conférences interactives, des discussions de réflexion, des séances de questions et réponses, et des travaux en groupes d’étude avec d’autres membres de l’OTAN et du Partenariat pour la paix.

« J’ai maintenant une meilleure idée de la portée et de l’ampleur de l’OTAN en général », affirme le major Brian Morrissette, pilote du 402e Escadron de l’Aviation royale canadienne à Winnipeg. « Obtenir le point de vue directement des autres étudiants de la classe en ce qui concerne l’OTAN, et comparer et échanger les pratiques exemplaires de la réserve a été une expérience d’apprentissage très pratique. »

Pendant le cours, les étudiants ont pris connaissance des structures de commandement et de fonctionnement de l’OTAN, des opérations actuelles, du concept stratégique de l’OTAN, du rôle de la Force de réserve au sein de l’OTAN ainsi que des modèles de mise sur pied et d’emploi de la force en ce qui concerne les forces de réserve nationales.

« Le principal avantage du cours sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve est le fait qu’il reflète la réalité opérationnelle et politique. Le cours commence par une séance de sensibilisation interculturelle offerte à l’école de l’OTAN », explique le lieutenant-colonel Stefan Ristow d’Allemagne, le directeur du cours. « Ce cours donne aux étudiants la possibilité de bâtir des réseaux. Nous ne pouvons pas résoudre les problèmes tous seuls. »

Pour encourager les interactions multiculturelles, les étudiants ont travaillé dans de petits groupes appelés « groupes d’étude » afin d’analyser les nouveaux rôles possibles des réservistes et ainsi tirer parti des capacités des réserves, de l’interopérabilité de la force régulière et la force de réserve, et du recrutement de la force de réserve.

« C’était l’occasion de me renseigner sur des aspects de l’OTAN que je ne connaissais pas, bien que j’aie participé à des opérations et à des exercices de l’OTAN », dit le capitaine Jon Baker du Quartier général du 38e Groupe-brigade du Canada, à Winnipeg. « Plus important encore, j’ai beaucoup aimé avoir la possibilité de discuter des défis communs avec d’autres officiers de réserve de l’OTAN et du Partenariat pour la paix. J’ai tiré des idées et du matériel de formation de cette expérience que j’intégrerai à l’instruction et à la planification de mon unité de réserve. »

Tel qu’il est indiqué sur le site Web de l’OTAN : « Les forces [de l’OTAN] sont actuellement présentes en Afghanistan, au Kosovo, en Méditerranée et au large de la Corne de l’Afrique. L’Alliance soutient aussi l’Union africaine, exécute des patrouilles aériennes au-dessus des pays baltes et réalise des activités de soutien de la défense aérienne en Turquie à la demande des Alliés ».

« Vous avez appris à comprendre les diversités de chacun et noué des amitiés, souligne le colonel Jaromir Alan de la République Tchèque, président du Comité des forces de réserve nationales (CFRN) de l’OTAN, à la suite des présentations des groupes d’études. La diversité est positive et évolutive. »

La présidence du CFRN change tous les deux ans. La République Tchèque a remplacé la Bulgarie en juillet 2016 et passera le flambeau à la Pologne en 2018. Le CFRN fournit des conseils stratégiques au Comité militaire de l’OTAN sur les questions concernant la réserve, renforce la Force de réserve grâce à des discussions sur les pratiques exemplaires et les leçons retenues, et assure la liaison avec les organisations participantes.

« Le cours sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve a donné une occasion sans pareille de maintenir le libre-échange de renseignements, indique le colonel Maria Gedayova de la République Tchèque, secrétaire générale du CFRN et officier responsable du cours. Vous avez produit des résultats concrets et le cours nous a permis de nous rassembler, de voir comment nous travaillons et de présenter nos cultures. »

« Le format du cours sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve est semblable au Comité des forces de réserve nationales, explique le colonel Alan. Vos résultats feront l’objet de discussions à la prochaine séance. »

En plus du cours en résidence, les étudiants ont participé à une formation à distance conjointe avancée sur les politiques de la Force de réserve de l’OTAN et l’intégration des perspectives sexospécifiques dans les opérations.

En tant que diplômés de l’école de l’OTAN, les étudiants auront maintenant accès à plus de 140 programmes avancés d’apprentissage à distance de grande qualité sur des sujets comme les techniques de maintien de la paix, les opérations dans l’ère de l’information, l’introduction au droit de Genève et au droit de La Haye, de même que la sensibilisation aux mines.

De plus en plus de réservistes contribuent aux opérations de l’OTAN, ce qui rend le CFRN d’autant plus pertinent puisqu’il favorise l’analyse des paradigmes nationaux uniques, diffuse des pratiques exemplaires et met l’accent sur l’intégration avec les Forces régulières aux fins d’excellence opérationnelle.

« Grâce au cours, je me suis familiarisé avec la complexité des enjeux liés à la sécurité auxquels l’OTAN est confrontée; cette familiarisation me servira au moment d’entamer le Programme de commandement et d’état-major interarmées et les opérations futures avec nos partenaires au sein de l’Alliance », a indiqué le capitaine de corvette Joseph Bank, commandant en second du Navire canadien de Sa Majesté (NCSM) Carleton à Ottawa.

« L’aspect interculturel du cours était très important; il est intéressant de savoir que d’autres pays partenaires ont des problèmes semblables aux nôtres [dans les Forces armées canadiennes], comme le recrutement et le soutien de l’employeur, et que ces partenaires emploient des pratiques exemplaires dont nous pouvons tirer des leçons. »

Parmi les autres étudiants des Forces armées canadiennes, on note le lieutenant-colonel Andrew Morrison, commandant du 36e Régiment des transmissions, dont le quartier général se situe à Halifax, en Nouvelle-Écosse, ainsi que le capitaine de corvette Sheyla Dussault, commandant en second du NCSM Carleton, ainsi que le major Stéphane Gosselin de la Direction des Réserves et le major John Nowak de la Direction des Réserves aériennes, tous deux à Ottawa.

Pour obtenir plus de renseignements, consultez le site Web de l’école de l’OTAN à l’adresse www.natoschool.nato.int (en anglais seulement).

Note de la rédaction : Le major Smith est l’officier d’état-major pour le perfectionnement professionnel et la gestion de l’instruction des réservistes dans la 2e Division aérienne du Canada. « J’ai eu la chance de participer au cours sur l’intégration de la Force de réserve à l’école de l’OTAN, dit-elle. Une compréhension des différentes approches nationales favorise une intégration transparente au moment des opérations et la transmission des pratiques exemplaires. J’ai aimé la possibilité d’apprendre de nos alliés lors de ce cours stimulant sur le plan professionnel qui met en contexte ce que nous faisons de façon quotidienne ».

 

Pour de plus amples renseignements sur des possibilités d’emploi passionnantes, significatives et enrichissantes au sein de la réserve partout au Canada, visitez le site Web des occasions d’emploi de la réserve. website