Environmental Preparation Training: Cadet perspective

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  • EPT – Fun & a chance to refresh basic skills

  • Army – Full Week of EPT – Very Beneficial

  • Air Force – III Year had His Eyes Opened

More…

Following are three write-ups on personal experiences through EVP. Regrettably we were unable to get a Navy perspective…But we will keep trying.

 

EPT – Fun & a chance to refresh basic skills

On the first day of BMOQ Mod 2 EPT, cadets were divided into five platoons (one for each division and a francophone platoon), led by BMOQ-qualified OCdts and supported by the training wing. We spent the better part of the morning practicing drill and giving drill commands. After lunch we learned how to give orders, a major component of BMOQ Mod 2.

On Tuesday, we learned about radio procedure and basic navigation skills. This was followed by a quick navigation exercise around the RMC campus.

On Wednesday, we gathered on the parade square to start our two days of field training in the CFB Kingston training area. After a ruck march to our destination, we set up our bivouacs and learned how to conduct Vehicle Checkpoints (VCPs), section attacks, field hygiene, how to properly use hand signals and tactical formations. Later, we embarked on a night navigation exercise where we put our navigation abilities to the test.

On Thursday morning, after tearing down our bivouacs, we conducted another navigation exercise, practiced C7 drills, and learned how to set up observation posts and how to tactically cross roads. After a hot lunch and informal AAR with our platoon staff, we ruck marched back to RMC.

The last day of EPT consisted of morning PT and a formal AAR in Currie Hall.

Overall, EPT was a fun experience and it gave me the chance refresh the basic skills that are necessary for an officer in the CAF. The best part for me personally was being the 2I/C for my section, especially during the night navigation exercise. Most importantly however I feel that the EPT served its purpose and that I am ready for my next phase of BMOQ.

OCdt (I) Ortega, 1 Sqn

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Army – Full Week of EPT – Very Beneficial

On Sunday night, staff from the CTC (Combat training Center) in CFB Gagetown arrived to mark the beginning of our week long EPT. On Monday, future BMOQ-L candidates were separated into two platoons and began training soon afterwards. We went over the basic functions of the C7 rifle, 522 radio and reviewed the fundamentals of navigation with a map and compass.

On Tuesday we left RMC and deployed to the training area at CFB Kingston to conduct land navigation. We deployed with ruck sacks and fighting order and practiced navigation throughout the morning and afternoon. On Wednesday we received a demonstration of a four person reconnaissance patrol, which is a critical evaluation on BMOQ-L. After the demonstration, we deployed once more to the field to watch a demonstration of a point reconnaissance. On Thursday, we witnessed a demonstration of a section level hasty attack and then deployed to the field to practice section attacks, another critical evaluation on the course.

Overall it was a very beneficial week for all the future BMOQ-L candidates. The staff from the infantry school at the Combat Training Center were very professional and their instruction helped prepare the officer cadets immensely.

– OCdt (III) Chadwick, 2 Sqn

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Air Force – III Year had His Eyes Opened

27079 Officer Cadet (III) Josh Siu – 7 Squadron

This year for Air Force EPT at the Royal Military College of Canada, the Officers were fortunate enough to have several very interesting and unique training sessions.

The week started with a Human Performance in Military Aviation (HPMA) refresher with Capt Lorri Weaver, followed by a friendly sports day. The next day, we had planned to have the Air Land Integration Cell of CADTC conduct Close Air Support training involving two Alpha Jet aircraft, two F-18 Hornets and a C-130T Hercules Tanker.

Unfortunately only one Alpha Jet was able to come, but the OCdts still had a great opportunity to conduct an attack simulation on RMCC and use some of the equipment that the unit brought along.

Thanks to many of the training wing staff including Capt Bobby Hartzell and Maj Kendra Hartery, we were able to invite two members from the aerospace school in Winnipeg, Maj Cameron Lowdon and Sgt James Novakowski, to teach the Basic Space Operator Course to the OCdts for the ensuing days.

First the briefings started with the history of humans in space and the influences of different nations and conflicts which led to advances in the area. Then the instructors continued to give the OCdts a better understanding of the field by talking about the different laws of space and the logistics involved.

The rest of the hours were spent talking about more technical detail and ideas, like why one cannot have a satellite always over one spot or why GPS systems work better on some days than others.

Overall, thanks to the efforts of the Major and Sergeant, we, as future officers, have now acquired a basic understanding of space and the involvement of both the international community and the Canadian Armed Forces.

Although these were a long couple of days of lectures, I, for one, can say that this opened my eyes and gave me a much better understanding and appreciation of the regime of space and the technology it allows us to employ.

Thank you again Major Lowdon and Sgt Novakowski, and good luck on your next postings!

More EPT photos by Melanie Hughes – Here