Ex-Cadets in the News

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  •  Germany bans drug linked to brain damage,ramps up pressure on Canada

  • 2 Ex Cadet astronauts salute John Glenn

  • Coastal Security Tops Maritime Agenda – TMG

  • New SAR training centre will have significant economic impact to Comox Valley

  • Combat Engineers build 45 metre ACROWTM bridge for Bathurst Community

  • Conservative leadership race loosens as contenders stumble

  • Successful takeoff for Operation UNIFIER flight safety course

  • 60 Seconds with 15141 Vice-Admiral Ron Lloyd, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy

  • Moral high as HMCS Charlottetown crew prepares to celebrate Christmas at sea while participating in Operation Reassurance

  • 75 years of Air Cadets: 22761  Max Dares & 18866 Eva Martinez

  • Issue of sex-selective abortion makes appearance in Tory leadership race

 Read More…

Germany bans drug linked to brain damage,ramps up pressure on Canada

16990 Steve Nash

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Canadian astronauts salute John Glenn

8276 Marc Garneau, 13738 Chris Hadfield

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Coastal Security Tops Maritime Agenda – TMG

11756 Les Chapman

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New SAR training centre will have significant economic impact to Comox Valley

13991 Fred Bigelow

Article

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Combat Engineers build 45 metre ACROWTM bridge for Bathurst Community

21447 Chris Cotton

Article

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Conservative leadership race loosens as contenders stumble

19894 Erin O’Toole

Article

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Successful takeoff for Operation UNIFIER flight safety course

10455 Jacques Michaud

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60 Seconds with 15141 Vice-Admiral Ron Lloyd, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy

Article

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Moral high as HMCS Charlottetown crew prepares to celebrate Christmas at sea while participating in Operation Reassurance

20604 Andrew Hingston

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Issue of sex-selective abortion makes appearance in Tory leadership race

14872 Pierre Lemieux

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75 years of Air Cadets

22761  Max Dares – From the Schweitzer 2-33 to Afghanistan and back again:

Joining 246 Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets at the age of 12 changed the course of my life. The training gained at the squadron, combined with attending training camps every summer, develop cadets into disciplined members of society. In the spring and the fall, the Air Cadet gliding program conducts familiarization flights at gliding centres across the country using Bellanca Scout and Cessna L-19 tow planes and Schweitzer 2-33A gliders. I, like all Air Cadets, had the chance to complete familiarization flights and to take the controls of the glider while under the careful watch of senior cadets and instructors. Taking these first flights in a glider instilled the love of flying for many, including myself, and the desire to pursue further training. I was lucky enough to move on to the next step, which is the full glider scholarship program in Trenton. During this six-week course, 29 dual and 20 solo flights are completed, leading to a Transport Canada glider pilot licence. Thousands of Canadians in civilian aviation and the military, including astronauts Col Chris Hadfield and LCol Jeremy Hansen, started their flying careers with the Air Cadet glider pilot scholarship program. Many also go on to a power scholarship, leading to a private pilot’s licence.

The discipline gained through the Air Cadet program helped with my selection for the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC). RMC offers a degree consisting of four pillars: academics, physical fitness, second language training, and military training. The close group of friends you make at RMC will last a lifetime because you get through the program together, from the gruelling recruit obstacle course to graduation. Taking a wide variety of arts courses in addition to our full complement of engineering courses certainly didn’t make the challenge any easier. Summers consisted of second language training, primary flying training (Phase 1 of pilot training), and “on-the-job training” summers. I was able to go back to my roots with the Air Cadet gliding program and work as a glider instructor and tow pilot for the OJT summers.

Following graduation from the Royal Military College and commissioning as a second lieutenant, I was off to basic flying training (Phase 2) in Moose Jaw, Sask., to fly 100 hours on the CT-156 Harvard II aircraft. This is a turboprop aircraft with a 1,300-horsepower PT-6 engine. On this very demanding course, we learned clearhood (VFR flying including circuits and aerobatics), low level navigation at 500 feet AGL and 240 knots groundspeed, instrument flying, and formation flying. This course is where you really learn the fundamentals of military flying. At the end of the course, you are selected for helicopters, fast jet, or multi-engine aircraft. The needs of the forces come first, but they try their best to get everyone what they want.

The RCAC gliding program is the largest of its kind in the world. Eric Dumigan Photo

Following selection, multi-engine and helicopter pilots return to Portage-la-Prairie, Man., for Phase 3 pilot training on the King Air C-90B or CH-139 Jet Ranger, and those selected for fast jet remain in Moose Jaw for further training on the Harvard II and then the Hawk for fighter lead-in training. The culmination of this level of pilot training results in the awarding of your Canadian Armed Forces pilot wings.

Following multi-engine training, I was posted to 436 Squadron in Trenton, Ont., to fly the CC-130H Hercules aircraft in the tactical airlift role. During this tour, I was able to use the valuable lessons learned in Air Cadets, RMC, and pilot training during four two-month deployments to Afghanistan. Commanding a four-engine turboprop aircraft, including crew and 90 passengers, while in a high-threat area of the world, at the age of 27, was only possible because of the high level of training I had received.

I then had the opportunity for an exchange posting with the United States Marine Corps flying the KC-130J Super Hercules tanker. The purpose of the exchange program is to share our tactics and procedures with other nations and bring lessons learned from other nations back to Canada. Following upgrade to aircraft commander, I was back in Kandahar for a seven-month deployment flying all roles with the KC-130J. This involved logistics runs (moving cargo and passengers), battlefield illumination with flares, air-to-air refuelling of Harriers conducting close air support, and aircraft delivered ground refuelling (refuelling helicopters and ground vehicles with the Herc with all engines running).

I now work in wing operations at 8 Wing Trenton as deputy of current operations and am learning another side of the aviation profession.

Air Cadets, and specifically the Air Cadet gliding program, instilled in me the love of flying and the self-discipline required to be successful at the Royal Military College and the pilot training within the Royal Canadian Air Force. Working in wing operations gives me the chance to return to my roots and fly the Bellanca Scout tow plane and instruct today’s Air Cadets on the Schweitzer 2-33A glider, while inspiring the next generation of cadets to pursue their own career in aviation or other life goals. “To learn; to serve; to advance.” – Capt Max Dares, deputy current operations, 8 Wing Trenton

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18866 Eva Martinez shares her Air Cadet experience…

“I joined 666 Civitan Squadron in Toronto when I was 14, after seeing some cadets at the local mall for Tag Day. I asked them to tell me about the program and their enthusiasm and pride were so contagious that I wanted to be a part of that. We had a lot of glider and power pilots at the squadron, so in an effort to balance the skill set I went the leadership route. My time at Senior Leaders in Cold Lake, Alta., followed by the international exchange to Hawaii, were definite highlights of my time with cadets. I was the first female cadet in the history of the squadron to make chief. I went on to join the Royal Canadian Air Force and served as an aircraft maintenance engineer for 13 years and now, even in the private sector working as an aerospace professional, I draw on the leadership lessons that I learned while in the air cadets every day. I stay connected with the program and recommend it to youth at every opportunity. Recently, I served in the Air Cadet League’s Ontario Provincial Committee’s Board of Governors. — Eva Martinez